The Clever Travel Companion Updates

7 Africa Travel Safety Tips (That work for the rest of the world too!) April 25 2016, 1 Comment

A few years ago I spent 7 months backpacking Africa, by myself, using only public transportation. Out of all the places I've traveled in the world, Africa has become my favorite. It's not too dangerous or unsafe either. By following the backpacking tips below, I navigated the entire continent as a solo girl without any problems. 

Backpacking Africa

 

  1. Keep Your Money/Valuables Hidden on You. I was never robbed, thankfully, but even if I was, the thief wouldn't have gotten much since my valuables were all hidden inside my Clever Travel Companion blank tank top (You can read more about how this kept me safe + tips on which size to buy, etc on my backpacking Africa travel blog). I met a backpacker in Tanzania, however, whose taxi driver drove him out of town, stole his wallet, then left him on the side of the road. Luckily, the driver was nice enough to reach back into my friend's wallet and give him enough change for a bus ride back to town (a very thoughtful thief!). But if this would have happened to me, the driver would have only gotten about $20 because the rest of my money, credit cards, and passport were concealed in my tank top.

 

  1. Watch Out for Thieves at Hostels. Unfortunately, some of the worst thieves are other backpackers or the cleaners at your backpacker lodge. To prevent this from happening to you, I recommend packing a lock and using it to secure the lockers that most hostels provide in the rooms. During my trip when this wasn't an option, I put all my important essentials in my Clever Travel tank, and folded it up nicely with the rest of my clothes. If someone did go through my stuff, they wouldn't steal a plain old item like that, and they also wouldn't suspect it was hiding my passport and money.

 

  1. Don't lose your Sh*T! I think it's normal to want to go a little crazy on vacation, especially the first few days or weeks. But that's when the most trouble happens. For me it meant I spent exorbitant amounts of money in the beginning when I was in South Africa and then had to do some serious damage control on my budget for the rest of the trip. I saw a lot of good people though doing drugs, breaking country laws knowingly, or hanging out at shady bars in shady areas which are all things they admitted to never doing at home.Then they got mad when they were arrested for smoking weed or held up after drinking in a ghetto. Granted, as a traveler you're not going to know all the laws and most places in Africa do look a little questionable, but my advice is to keep yourself together and make sure you're making smart choices even in the beginning.

 

  1. Ask Locals for Advice. The best way I stayed safe while backpacking Africa was by asking locals safety advice then following it. For example, an American expat in Rwanda told me I could walk down a dark alley in Kigali at 2am with all my valuables out in the open, and nothing bad would happen. And although I didn't quite test it out, I did feel very safe. But in Nairobi, a local told me that as soon as it gets dark, I needed to quit walking and take a taxi even if I was only going a few blocks away. So that's what I did, and what I credit to a fun (and safe) experience in the town whose bad reputation earned it the name “Nairobbery.”

 

Kids in Ethiopia

 

  1. Use Common Sense. Looking back, most my travel mistakes happened because I just didn't use common sense. The same was true for other travelers. Like when my backpacking friend, Oron, got malaria because he forgot to take his anti-malaria medicine for three weeks. Or when I recently heard of a traveler getting gored by a rhino because he got too close to it during a photo-op. Usually the unfortunate happens in travel because we just quit thinking.

 

  1. Leave the Situation-Fast! No matter, how careful you are, you can still easily wind up in a bad situation accidentally. My advice-run! That's what I did when I ended up in a really sketchy hostel in Durban, South Africa that looked more like a crack den. I found some Canadian backpackers who felt the same as me, and we shared a taxi and got out of there quick! I met some British girls who told me in Malawi that they went out clubbing with a local guy, but started to feel uncomfortable with how he was acting and where he was taking them. They nicely came up with an excuse and left. Even if everything seems fine, but you just have a bad feeling, I'd listen to it because it's literally better to be safe than sorry.

 

  1. Don't Tempt a Thief. While no situation justifies robbing or harming someone, there's no reason to make it easy. I always cringed when I saw someone walking around with a money belt. In my opinion, that just screams, “Rob me!” Their cash could be just as easily reached, however, in the pocket of a Clever Travel Companion pair of underwear, only with the added advantage of being secure. Same thing goes for a Chinese backpacker I met who was walking around Mozambique with her computer in a laptop case. I felt really bad when someone stole it from her when she was walking back from an internet cafe, but at the same time, locals never looked twice at me when I was carrying my computer because I was storing it in my dusty backpack.

 

I hope you see that backpacking Africa can be easily (and safely) traveled. Because even though I had visited over 20 countries before my trip—including European, Asian, and Latino, I found African countries to be the best for so many reasons!

Check out my blog Backpacking Africa for Beginners www.backpackingafricaforbeginners.com for more ideas on which countries to visit and how to do it, plus get a free 15% off coupon to Clever Travel Companion by downloading the complete edition of my free African travel E-book and check out this blog to see what other neat stuff Clever Travel gear can do!

 

About the Author: Val Bowden backpacked from Cape Town to Cairo, going through 13 African countries, all by herself. After her trip, she moved back to the continent and has been living in Addis Ababa ever since. You can download her E-book, Backpacking Africa for Beginners http://backpackingafricaforbeginners.com/book/or her guides on Ethiopia, Kilimanjaro, & scoring cheap flights for free (although any contribution goes towards a social impact business she's starting in Ethiopia).

 

Camping in Africa


10 Things You MUST Not Do Abroad April 25 2016, 0 Comments


All of us have heard horror stories from every region on the globe. Mention a country or a city, or type in a place name on Google and you'll certainly drag up some stories you wish you hadn't. Stories that will make you question whether to visit the destination, whether to take a vacation or whether to leave the house at all.


It's true there are dangers everywhere in the world, its the reason Clever Travel Companion and its travel safety gear exists at all but how common are they and of the stories you read, how much is actually reported? Well it is safe to say there's a little bit more to most than what you will be able to find out.


Most horror stories can be traced back to mostly unintended tourist negligence, so we've put together a guide of what NOT to do in order to avoid ruining your trip.

 

Unlicensed Money Exchange

Don't flash large sums of foreign or local cash nor exchange money at non-registered or shady looking money exchanges

 

Typical Tourist

 

Don't look like an obvious tourist, leave the Hawaiian shirt at home and try not to consult maps in public or look lost.
 
Anti-theft Clothing
 
Don't carry a backpack that looks like luggage or even at all. Use Clever Travel Companion pickpocket proof gear instead
 

Motorbike snatch thief

Don't walk with your bag loosely hung over your shoulder or facing the roadside. This will deter bike thieves from targeting you

 

Walking alone in the dark

Don't visit dangerous places or walk in unfamiliar, isolated or dimly lit areas. Especially at night. This may seem obvious but its very easy to neglect

 

Misplaced passport

Don't leave your valuables in public view. That includes your passport as much as your iPhone. Again, the best solution is Clever Travel Companion

 

Hitchhiker

Don't park anywhere but in a well-lit place, take all valuables with you or lock them in the trunk. Leave hitchhikers to locals

 

Rental Car

Don't drive an obvious or labelled rental car, hide maps, travel docs and other valuables in the glove compartment. Rental cars are targeted by thieves so make sure you're insured properly

 

Hotel Room Key

Don't keep your house or hotel keys on the same ring as your vehicle key, leave your accommodation keys with reception

 

Lost luggage

Don't keep cash, jewelry, medicine or other valuables in your luggage and never leave your bags unattended. Use Clever Travel Companion's secret pockets instead

 

As mentioned above, most problems overseas can be caused through general tourist negligence and most of those above could be considered obvious and relate to the treatment of your valuables, not behaving like an obvious tourist, making yourself a target and as sad as it is to say, making yourself "worth attacking". The fact of the matter is that although having your valuables stolen or being mugged is incredibly scary and inconvenient, you will live to fight another day. The unfortunate truth of the world we live in is that often, these small, petty crimes are what leads to escalated violence, so remaining vigilant over your belongings and following the above rules will keep you safe and happy.
One sure fire way of doing this, is to use Clever Travel Companion's gear. Afterall, it is what it was created for. It's incredibly functional, it suits all travelers with a discreet design and keeps valuables safe and sound and out of sight.
So to use the old cliché "better safe than sorry", ensure your own safety on your next trip and make sure you're wearing Clever Travel Companion